Kate Annand

k.annand@doughtystreet.co.uk

Year of Call

2007
Kate Annand
Profile

Kate has a broad civil practice in international and European human rights law, employment and discrimination law, and actions against the police.

International Law

Kate was led by Edward Fitzgerald QC in Mangouras v Kingdom of Spain (Application no. 12050/04) before the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights. The application challenged the decision of the Spanish Government to set a bail security at 3,000,000 Euros as a breach of Article 5(3) of the European Convention.

Kate was junior counsel in the case of M.S. v United Kingdom (Application no. 24527/08). In 2012, the European Court unanimously held that the detention of a mentally ill man in a police cell for over three days violated his rights under Article 3.

In 2010, Kate was awarded a Pegasus Scholarship by the Inns of Court. From June to September 2010, Kate was working at the National Security Project and Human Rights Department of the American Civil Liberties Union in New York. She was involved in a case challenging the United States government's use of unmanned aeroplanes ("drones") to target suspected terrorists abroad: Al-Aulaqi v. Obama.

Employment and Industrial Relations

Kate regularly appears in employment tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal in relation to claims for unfair dismissal, TUPE transfers, whistle blowing claims, and breach of contract.

In November 2011, she successfully appealed a decision in the EAT regarding when a respondent can seek to join another respondent without the claimant's consent: Beresford v (1) Sovereign House Estates Limited (2) Mrs Humphries [2012] I.C.R. D9.

In May 2013, Kate successfully appealed a Tribunal’s decision regarding an employee’s right to be accompanied by a trade union representative at a grievance meeting by a companion of his choice: Toal v GB Oils [2013] I.R.L.R. 696.

Kate is also regularly instructed to represent employees at mediations in relation to employment disputes.

Equality and Discrimination

Kate is regularly instructed in a number of employment cases involving age, disability, sex, and race discrimination.

Kate successfully represented a claimant who sued her former employers for disability discrimination and successfully defended the appeal in the EAT in April 2012: Harris v Prospects for People with Learning Disabilities, [2012] Eq.L.R. 781.

Kate has experience of high value claims. In January 2014, a claimant represented by Kate was awarded over £240,000 in compensation.

Kate also has considerable experience in non-employment discrimination cases, and in particular discrimination claims against the police.

Actions Against the Police and Public Authorities

Kate appears for claimants in civil actions against the police in relation to claims for assault, false imprisonment, malicious prosecution, misfeasance in public office, breaches of the Data Protection Act and violations of the Human Rights Act 1998. Recently Kate successfully represented a claimant in the County Court in his claims for assault, intimidation, and a breach of Article 8 and Kate has successfully defended a number of strike out applications.

Kate is also regularly instructed in discrimination claims against the police. She currently represents a number of claimants in disability and race discrimination cases against the police.

Kate also a represented a mother at the inquest examining the circumstances of her son’s death at a prison in the Isle of Wight. The jury returned a critical narrative verdict, highlighting a number of failings by the prison. 

Education

LLB

MA International Peace and Security,

Middle Temple Diplock Scholar

Pegasus Scholar

 

Memberships

Employment Lawyers Association

Publications

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